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Greater London

Greater London is divided into 32 London boroughs, each governed by a London borough council, and the City of London, which has a unique government dating back to the 12th century.
The term "London" is normally used in reference to Greater London or to the overall metropolis, but not often to the ancient, tiny City of London. Instead, this small area is often referred to simply as "the City" or "the Square Mile" and it forms the main financial district. Archaically the urbanised area of London was known as the Metropolis. In common usage, the terms "London" and "Greater London" are usually used interchangeably. It is officially divided for some purposes, with varying definitions, into Inner London and Outer London. For strategic planning purposes the region is divided into five sub regions.
With increasing industrialization, London's population grew rapidly throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries, and it was the most populated city in the world until overtaken by New York in 1925. Its population peaked at 8,615,245 in 1939. There were an estimated 7,753,600 official residents in Greater London as of mid-2009.
However, London's continuous urban area extends beyond the borders of Greater London and was home to an estimated 9,332,000 people in 2005, while its wider metropolitan area has a population of between 12 and 14 million depending on the definition of that area. According to Eurostat, London is the most populous city and metropolitan area of the European Union.
The region covers an area of 1,579 square kilometers. The population density is 4,761 people per square kilometer, more than ten times that of any other British region. In terms of population, London is the 25th largest city and the 17th largest metropolitan region in the world. It is also ranked 4th in the world in number of US dollar billionaires residing in the city. London ranks as one of the most expensive cities in the world, alongside Tokyo and Moscow.
Ethnic Diversity:
In the 2001 census, 71.15% of these seven and a half million people classed their ethnic group as white, including the White British (59.79%), White Irish (3.07%) or "Other White" (8.29%, mostly Greek- and Turkish-Cypriot, Italian and French). 12.09% classed themselves as British Asian, including Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and "Other Asian" (mostly Sri Lankan, Arab and other Southern Asian ethnicities).
10.91% classed themselves as Black British (around 7% as Black African, 3% as Black Caribbean, 0.84% as "Other Black"). 3.15% were of mixed race; 1.12% as Chinese; and 1.58% as other (mostly Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and other "British Orientals"). 21.8% of inhabitants were born outside the European Union. The Irish, from both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, number about 200,000, as do the Scots and Welsh combined.
In January 2005, a survey of London's ethnic and religious diversity claimed that there were more than 300 languages spoken and more than 50 non-indigenous communities with a population of more than 10,000 in London. Figures from the Office for National Statistics show that, as of 2006, London's foreign-born population is 2,288,000 (31%), up from 1,630,000 in 1997. The 2001 census showed that 27.1% of Greater London's population were born outside the UK, and a slightly higher proportion were classed as non-white.
London has been a focus for immigration for centuries, whether as a place of safety or for economic reasons. Huguenots, eastern European Jews and Cypriots are examples of the former; Irish, Bangladeshis and West Indians came for new lives. The East End district around Spitalfields has been first home for several ethnic groups, which have subsequently moved elsewhere in London as they gained prosperity.
The largest ethnic-minority communities are the Jamaican in Brixton, Hackney and Tottenham; West African in Southwark; West Indians and West Africans in Lewisham; Indians in Ealing, Brent, Harrow, Hounslow, Redbridge, Newham and Hillingdon; Pakistani and Bangladeshi in Newham, Tooting, East Ham, Wembley, Harringey Tower Hamlets, Waltham Forest, and Barking & Dagenham; Tamil in Harrow, Watford (in Hertfordhsire), East Ham, Wembley and Tooting; and East African and Caribbean in Harlesden and Stonebridge. A sizeable Italian community live in the Enfield area of Freezywater and close by at Waltham Cross and Cheshunt, (both in Hertfordshire).
All London borough councils belong to the London Councils association. Two London boroughs, Kensington and Chelsea, and Kingston, carry the purely honorific title of Royal borough. Within the City of London boundary are the liberties of Middle Temple and Inner Temple.
The term Greater London had been used well before 1965, particularly to refer to the area covered by the Metropolitan Police District (such as in the 1901 census), the area of the Metropolitan Water Board (favored by the London County Council for statistics), the London Passenger Transport Area and the area defined by the Registrar General as the Greater London Conurbation.
Population:
The population on the current territory of Greater London rose from about 1.1 million in 1801 (back then only about 0.85 million people were in the urban area of London, while 0.25 million were living in villages and towns not yet part of London) to an estimated 8.6 million in 1939, but declined to 6.7 million in 1988, before starting to rebound in the 1990s.
As of 2006, the population in Greater London has only recovered to the level of 1970 (which was also the level of population in the 1920s). Some researchers expect the population of Greater London to reach 8.15 million by 2016, which would still be 0.45 million short of the 1939 peak.
Figures here are for Greater London in its 2001 limits. Figures before 1971 have been reconstructed by the Office for National Statistics based on past censuses in order to fit the 2001 limits. Figures from 1981 onward are midyear estimates (revised as of August 2007), which are more accurate than the censuses themselves, known to underestimate the population of London.
Religion:
The largest religious groupings in London are Christian (58.2%), those of no religion (15.8%), Muslim (8.2%), Hindu (4.1%), Jewish (2.1%), and Sikh (1.5%). London has traditionally been Christian, and has a large number of churches, particularly in the City. The famous St Paul's Cathedral in the City and Southwark Cathedral south of the river are Anglican administrative centres, while the head of the Church of England and worldwide Anglican Communion, the Archbishop of Canterbury, has his main residence at Lambeth Palace in the London Borough of Lambeth.
Geography
Greater London is bounded by the home counties of Essex and Hertfordshire in the East of England, and of Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Surrey and Kent in South East England. The highest point in Greater London is Westerham Heights, in the North Downs and on the boundary with Kent, at 245 metres (804 ft).
Greater London is not a city in the proper sense that the word applies in the United Kingdom, that of being a status granted by the Crown. In addition, one of the London boroughs, Westminster, is already a city, as well as the City of London itself which would make such a status anomalous. Despite this, Greater London is commonly regarded as a city in the general sense of a municipality. A Lord Lieutenant of Greater London is appointed for its area, less the City of London, an area identical to the Metropolitan Police District, and for the purposes of the Lieutenancies Act 1997, this area is defined as a county.

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Videos


Tim Keller on missional church

Tim Keller speaks on what it means to be a missional church.

Michael Frost on missional church planting

A searis of church planting topics by Micheal Frost.  Dr. Frost is a church planter, author, and professor in Australia.  He also speaks throughout the world on missional church planting.

Michael Frost on missional church planting

A searis of church planting topics by Micheal Frost.  Dr. Frost is a church planter, author, and professor in Australia.  He also speaks throughout the world on missional church planting.

Michael Frost on missional church planting

A searis of church planting topics by Micheal Frost.  Dr. Frost is a church planter, author, and professor in Australia.  He also speaks throughout the world on missional church planting.

Michael Frost on missional church planting

A searis of church planting topics by Micheal Frost.  Dr. Frost is a church planter, author, and professor in Australia.  He also speaks throughout the world on missional church planting.

Michael Frost on missional church planting

A searis of church planting topics by Micheal Frost.  Dr. Frost is a church planter, author, and professor in Australia.  He also speaks throughout the world on missional church planting.

Michael Frost on missional church planting

A searis of church planting topics by Micheal Frost.  Dr. Frost is a church planter, author, and professor in Australia.  He also speaks throughout the world on missional church planting.

Michael Frost on missional church planting

A searis of church planting topics by Micheal Frost.  Dr. Frost is a church planter, author, and professor in Australia.  He also speaks throughout the world on missional church planting.

Missional Church

What is missional Church?  Watch the video on a simple way to explain it.

Missional Church

What is missional Church?  Watch the video on a simple way to explain it.

Photos


When the city sleeps, London 2012 Olympics and more

Olympic photos and other icons of London.

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Greater London .1

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Books, Links, and Other Stuff


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Couch Surfing

NO!  It’s not about taking your old sofa down to the beach or trying to stand up on it while strapped to the roof of the car.  It’s about making deep connections with people who live in your adopted borough!

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Expand your Library

Recommended reading for Borough Strategy Catalysts.

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Borough Stats

  • Populations in this Borough:
    • United Kingdom 5,230,155
    • India 172,162
    • Republic of Ireland 157,285
    • Bangladesh 84,565
    • Jamaica 80,319
    • Nigeria 68,907
    • Pakistan 66,658
    • Kenya 66,311
    • Sri Lanka 49,932
    • Ghana 46,513
    • Cyprus 45,888
    • South Africa 45,506
    • United States 44,622
    • Australia 41,488
    • Germany 39,818
    • Turkey 39,128
    • Italy 38,694
    • France 38,130
    • Somalia 33,831
    • Uganda 32,082
    • New Zealand 27,494
  • Size - 607 square miles
  • Total Population - 8 million

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